Before There was Amplitube…

…there was tone.

……

This is quite literally the worst thing you can think of. Not just flange…metal flange. And not just metal flange, a metal flange digital plugin for amplitube. Now, I like metal as much as the next guy. (Hmm…not sure what that means.) But, I implore you…take the money you would spend on amplitube metal plugins, and spend it on a Valve Junior, an EH Little Big Muff, and lunch for your local Sports Bar Grill guitarist who plays through that grungy old-looking Fender, so you can talk tone with him.

Also…if anyone happens to have any ‘metal flanger plugin’ clips, I think that would be just about the best thing ever. :)

Splendid.
Karl.

19 thoughts on “Before There was Amplitube…

  1. Nic–hahaha

    Nate–lol Oh, absolutely. ;)

    Rhoy–ya, not the worst thing ever…but sounds about like I expected it. Except for the artifacts…lots of those after the initial effect is dying off. ?? At least that’s what I think I’m hearing. ;) For all I know, you secretly linked to a U2 B-side to trick me. haha

  2. I have recently fallen in love with modulation. I have even considered buying a flanger recently… I’ve heard a couple of good clips where a flanger does wonders for ambient style stuff.

  3. I realize that some folks may be using Amplitude live. However the primary purpose (and therefore the best value) is using Amplitude in the studio. When I track electric guitars for recording projects, although I will go through the exercise of mic-ing guitar players’ amps, I also always ensure that I have a direct box inserted between the guitar and the start of the player’s signal chain (i.e. a ‘dry signal’). 95% of the time, I find that the mic’ed track of the amp setup isn’t usable, primarily because many of the guitar players with whom I’ve been working on different projects don’t really ‘know’ how to dial in their amp sounds. They spend too much time listening to their amps blowing past their knees, which isn’t what a microphone is ‘hearing’ (BTW, assuming you’re playing through a FOH system that’s optimized to the performance venue, the mark that a guitar player has his guitar sounds ‘dialed in’ is when the FOH engineer doesn’t have to use large amounts of EQ to make your mic’ed amp sound correctly in the mix). Furthermore, there’s the age-old problem of “what might sound good to your ears playing live in 3D” doesn’t sit correctly in a stereo mix, particularly as you start adding and using other ancillary instrument tracks that you don’t ordinarily have when you’re playing live.

    This is where Amplitude shines. Since I’ve got the original ‘performance track’ of the dry guitar signal, by using Amplitude, I can reshape that performance track to best fit the song’s production approach. 99% of the time I use Amplitude in the studio, I’ll hear comments like, “Wow… How can I get that same sound live? (if it’s the guitar player)” or “What pedals, etc. did you use to get that sound? (if it’s someone listening to the project that wasn’t involved in it’s production).

    So… While for ‘live’ stuff, I’m right there with Karl, et. al., on tubes and analog signal chains, I sure do love the digital tools available for creating tone magic in the studio — LOL! :)

  4. Samuel–lol!!

    Mike Oliver–I’m glad it can give you some decent sounds. Not a huge fan of it myself, but I do know a lot of folks with great tone who use it in the studio. :) And is it ‘amplutide’? Did I just see ‘amplitube’ because I wanted to? hahaha

    Chris–lol Okay…light flange is okay…maybe… ;)

    Tim–oh no. I know without even looking at it. ZooTV flanged out ‘Desire’. It’s just plain wrong. lol

  5. *Sigh*…against my better judgement, here you go Tim…hehehehe

    Proof that not everything U2 does is gold. Most stuff, lol, but not all…definitely not all.

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